Volume 2 Issue 1

Volume 2 Issue 1

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Research Article

Body Mass Profiles Among Younger and Older Hip Osteoarthritis Cases Requiring Surgery Suggests Excess Body Mass Does Influence Disease Onset and Complication Rates

Running title: Hip osteoarthritis and body mass

Ray Marks*

The prevailing literature is inconsistent concerning the relationship of excess body mass to the onset and progression of disabling hip osteoarthritis, often deemed an age associated disease. We examined the distribution of body mass indices among a sample of severely disabled hip osteoarthritis patients relative to age, and surgical status. Data from the available records of 997 severely disabled hip osteoarthritis cases undergoing surgery subjected to correlational analyses showed more cases among the sample had body mass indices indicative of being overweight or obese than  underweight or normal weight (p=.001).

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Public Policy Article 

Demolishing Obesity via a Circadian Cutting-Edge Public Science

Akbar Nikkhah*

This article describes an innovative circadian methodology to optimize timing of nutrient assimilation to prevent obesity and minimize risks from diabetes and cardiovascular complexities. The approach is based on distributing frequent small meals during day and taking no major starchy and fatty meal overnight. Creating a circadian rhythm of food intake that does not overload splanchnic cells with torrents of substrates at wrong times of the 24-period, when insulin and the interconnected endocrinology do not work properly, is the rising public science in preventing obesity.

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Research Article Obesity and Depression among Asian Indians in the United States: Findings from the MASALA StudyNatasha Din, MBBS, Alka M. Kanaya, MD *
Obesity is one of the leading health problems in the world and in the U.S. in particular. The most common method for diagnosing overweight and obesity is by using a surrogate measure of body mass index (BMI). However, BMI is an imperfect marker for total body fat and even less suitable to measure body fat distribution. BMI or waist circumference do not completely account for body composition, whereas WHR (waist-to-hip circumference ratio) is a measure of body shape and to some extent lower trunk adiposity. Studies have shown WHR is a good predictor for several non-communicable diseases.

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