Article in Press

Volume 5 Issue 1

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Research article

The Postoperative Management of Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Elbow in Athletes

M. Nagel *1, I.F. Kodde 1 and D. Eygendaal1,2

The medial collateral ligament (MCL), or ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), consists of the anterior bundle, the posterior bundle and the transverse ligament. The MCL is the primary constraint to joint valgus forces. Failure of the MCL can result in instability and secondary symptoms as pain, posterior impingement or ulnar nerve symptoms. This often occurs in overhead athletes because of the repeated excessive valgus stress.

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Research article

Management of Paediatric Wrist Fractures in The Community – Time to Rethink Our Approach?

Ivan Koay*1

Paediatric wrist fractures are one of the more common injuries presenting to medical centres and emergency departments world-wide. Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) database and 2010 US Census information indicate that among the paediatric population (0-19y) fracture occurrence was 9.4 per 1000 children with fractures of the lower arm accounting for 17.8% of all fractures reported [1]. These numbers have been noted to be steadily increasing over the last 40years with some conjecture that this may be due to the increased involvement in formal sports activities at an increasingly higher level, improved access to medical care along with more accurate medical assessments and increased use of radiological imaging to obtain diagnosis [2].

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Mini-review

Considering Posterior Sacroiliac Joint Ligaments and its Potential Outcome for the Clinician need for a Paradigm Change

Sergio Marcucci*1

The sacroiliac joints (SIJ) are encompassed between two bony structures, the iliac and sacral bone [1]. The first
function of the SIJ is to preserve stability, sustained by an important network of ligaments attached to the SIJ [1]. Another
aim of the SIJ is to ensure the force transmission of vertical forces to the pelvic bone and lower extremities [2]. The SIJ also
is an important source for low back pain (LBP) [3]. This has been argued by Hamidi-Ravari et al. (2014) [1], who stated
that the majority of people suffering from LBP would also be experiencing SIJ pain.

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Research article

Musculoskeletal Disorders of Rice Workers and the Effect of Breeding Movements on them

Mohammadbagher Forghani Ozrudi 1* and  Hosein Akbarnejad Kalaei2

The present research is going to study the musculoskeletal disorders of rice workers and the effect of breeding movements on them. So, Nordic questionnaire was screened for studying the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and also for risk exposure check of musculoskeletal disorders in 3 occupational tasks and Quick Exposure Check (QEC) was applied. Nordic questionnaire was distributed among 258 rice farmers 34 out of whom suffering from musculoskeletal disorders were identified and participated as samples in the selected corrective plan and ergonomic interventions for 8 weeks.

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Case Report

DBM in Upper Arm Non-Union Fracture

Giampietro Bertasi1*, P Murena2 and A Cordisco3

Fractures that no longer heal or show no bone union due to the cessation of reparative processes are classified as
non-union fractures [1].This classification is typically diagnosed roughly 6 to 9 months following fracture [1, 3].
The diagnosis of non-unions includes pain at the fracture site, radiological signs during treatment, and impediments to motion [1]. There are several treatments for non-union fractures. One of which is the use of cancellous bone
allografts [3, 4]. These allografts allow for improved osteogenesis and also eliminate the donor site morbidity associated with autografts [3, 4, and 5]

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