Volume 2 Issue 2

Volume 2 Issue 2

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Editorial

Epidemiology of Cancer in Adults in Relation to Childhood Infectious Burden of the Country

Ashok K. Vijh Ph.D., D.Sc., F.R.S. Canada*

During our investigations, it was noted that a developing country such as India, whose population is subjected  to very heavy infectious burdens, shows surprisingly low incidence of some major cancers. Further explorations indicated that when all (or at least major) cancers are considered together, lowest incidence is indicated in countries such as Thailand, Honduras, Dominican Republic, Philippines and Mexico, or, Senegal and India; much higher incidence of cancer is observed in U.S.A., Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Western European countries (Table I).

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Editorial

Uranium Epidemiology

Christopher Busby*

If the illumination of epidemiology is there to identify threats and save lives it is high time its searchlight beam was seriously directed at the element Uranium and its health effects. Uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust, and has been locked up as insoluble ores in most rocks and soils throughout evolutionary history. But after the discovery of radioactivity, the initial rush to extract Radium, and then later the bombs and the energy, a Uranium economy developed. After the 1950s, because of nuclear weapons tests and nuclear energy the quantities of the material released into the biosphere increased enormously.

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Editorial

Inflammation, Infectious Burden and Cancer: an Epidemiological Paradox

Ashok K. Vijh Ph.D., D.Sc., F.R.S. Canada*

There is considerable literature on fundamental studies on the connection between inflammation and cancer. Many cancers are believed to arise from sites of infection, chronic irritation and inflammation. Epidemiological data, however, appear to be difficult to reconcile with these studies on the biology of inflammation and cancer.In most developing countries such as India, populations are subjected to heavy infectious burdens owing to poverty, over-crowding, lack of sanitary facilities and hygienic environment, limited access (specially in the rural areas) to clean water, etc.; the evidence for this is infantile mortality at alarming rates.

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