Editor note: Community Medicine

Editor note

Community Medicine

*Corresponding author: Dr. Mohana Priya, School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

The scope of the journal provides information on all the latest information in community medicine and clinical studies in all areas of clinical Community medicine which deals with public health services and emphasizing preventive medicine and epidemiology of a particular community.

Journal of Community Medicine Volume 2 Issue 1 published articles discussing studies to obtain the public concept about Coronaviruses about symptoms, mode of transmission, prevention, and management of coronavirus from people visiting KAMC-Riyadh [1], assessment of poultry handlers risk perception of Avian Influenza in Suez Canal Area, Egypt [2], CBPR methods to prevent HIV infection in diverse communities was systematically reviewed [3], to test the amount of energy acceptability levels in homemade food with zinc and also counselling to make up proper growth levels after diarrhea [4], and summarize data on use of smartphone apps for promoting physical activity based upon bibliographic searches [5].

Coronaviruses are enveloped viruses with a positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome and with a nucleocapsid of helical symmetry. The first coronavirus was first reported to WHO in Saudi. Mohammed Al Shaalan et al. [1]., carried out a cross-sectional and survey-based study to obtain the public concept about Coronaviruses about symptoms, mode of transmission, prevention, and management of coronavirus from people coming to KAMC-Riyadh. The questionnaire was distributed to KAMC visitors, including age, gender, education, marital status, employment and income status. For sampling author used convenience non-random method. From survey, the level of awareness was observed to be good among the study group with regard to the symptoms and mode of transmission. However, there were some misconceptions, which needed to be clarified in order to prevent and manage coronavirus.

In Egypt, avian influenza confirmed human cases have flowed into unexpected levels in Egypt compared to the previous years. The ministry of health is doing an effort to raise the public awareness about the disease through radio and television. Despite that, knowledge about risk perception of avian influenza among poultry handlers is threatening. That is reflected on the use of personal protective tools and hygiene and on the medical seeking behavior on suffering the disease symptoms, leading to increased disease morbidity and mortality. Lamiaa A Fiala et al. [2]., assess poultry handlers risk perception of Avian Influenza in Suez Canal Area, Egypt. From the assessment about 90% of the sample population heard regarding Avian influenza disease but do not follow the protective measures. However, on suffering with the symptoms of influenza, either they neglect the symptoms or obtain flu medicine over the counter without any medical consultation. Hence, author concluded that the Avian Influenza risk awareness is poor and how serious is the avian influenza disease and how vulnerable Egyptian poultry handlers are. Thus, they are in need to use personal protective measures and medical help.

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods to prevent HIV infection in diverse communities was systematically reviewed by Steven S Coughlin et al. [3]., as part of the planning process for a new study. Published articles on HIV prevention studies that employed CBPR methods were identified from the period of January 1, 2005 to April 30, 2014 using PubMed databases and keyword searches. A total of 44 studies on CBPR and HIV/AIDS prevention were identified, of which 3 were focused on adolescents, 33 on adults, and 8 were both on adolescents and adults. A variety of at-risk populations were the focus of the studies employed CBPR methods to address HIV prevention. Many of the studies were limited to formative research. However, it is suggested that more CBPR studies and faith-based session are needed with adequate sample sizes and rigorous study designs to address lack of knowledge of HIV and inadequate screening in diverse communities to address health disparities and preventable morbidity and mortality.

The recurrences of diarrhea results into loss or gain of weight, to enhance and maintain good health growth after diarrhea a proper nutritional rehabilitation is required. The purpose of the study by Saijuddin Shaikh et al. [4]., is to test the amount of energy acceptability levels in homemade food with zinc and also counseling to make up proper growth levels. On this purpose author conducted a study involving a total of 63 diarrheal patients, aged 6-12 months, admission to hospital for 2-4 days and outcomes were studied on their discharge day. In this process, determination of Hb, supplements and Zinc syrup were provided. Further, mothers were counseled for 25-30 minutes at each visit, it was understood that community acceptance of food and counseling was very positive. From studies it was observed that no child had new diarrheal episode after discharge from hospital. Hence, mother cooked with food supplemental package was a good intervention. However, it is suggested that there is a need of weekly adherence, monitoring and carefully crafted feeding instructions by health workers in order to monitor children’s growth bi-monthly to understand their better health.

With the developments in technology, there are very few research studies to determine the use of smartphone apps and effectiveness in promoting health. In this article, Steven S. Coughlin et al. [5]., summarize data on use of smartphone apps for promoting physical activity based upon bibliographic searches. Out of the 15, 6 were qualitative research studies, 8 were randomized control trials, and one was a non-randomized study. The found results indicated that smartphone apps can be effective in promoting physical activity. However, in article it is suggested that for future studies research designs with larger sample sizes, and longer study periods are required to establish the physical activity measurement and intervention capabilities of smartphones. Also, there is a need to increase knowledge and awareness of health behaviors.

For more information: https://jacobspublishers.com/jacobs-journal-of-community-medicine-issn-2381-2788

Reference:

  1. Mohammed Al Shaalan, Aamir Omair, Muayad Alsharyoufi, Jamal Bin Abdullah, Sultan Y Al-Howti. Public Awareness about Corona Virus for KAMC Visitors in Riyadh.
  2. Lamiaa A Fiala , Moustafa AF Abbas. Avian Influenza Risk Perception Among Egyptian Poultry Handlers.
  3. Steven S Coughlin. Community-Based Participatory Research Studies on HIV/AIDS Prevention, 2005- 2014.
  4. Saijuddin Shaikh, Dilip Mahalanabis, Dilip Paul, Anumita Mallick. Acceptability of Homemade Food, Zinc and Counseling to Reduce Growth-Faltering and Increase Catch up Growth after Diarrhea in India.
  5. Steven S. Coughlin, Mary Whitehead, Joyce Q. Sheats, Jeff Mastromonico, Selina Smith. A Review of Smartphone Applications for Promoting Physical Activity.

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