Editor notes: Experimental Dermatology

Editor notes: Experimental Dermatology

Soumya Jal*, Ph.D

Department of Bioinformatics, School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

*Corresponding author: Soumya Jal, Department of Bioinformatics, School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

Journal provides paths from molecular studies to clinical investigations, providing new information that can be reviewed with speed and efficiently. Journal provides valid information about normal and pathological processes in skin development, aging and treatment, as well as basic research into histology of dermal and dermal structures that provide clinical insights and potential treatment options.

Jacobs Journal of Experimental Dermatology of volume 1 issue 1 published articles on second-degree thermal skin burn and application of topical clobetasol in combination with tretinoin in other to prevent the scar formation [1], a series of eight case reports on Ant-induced Alopecia observed in south-west of Iran [2], and reported a case of a woman with inguinal lesions with granular parakeratosis [3], application of human recombinant Dnase 1 for eradication of multiple primary and metastatic melanoma types via in-vitro studies [4], with investigation of the consistency between labelling and chemically detected amounts of 7 preservatives in consumer products bought on the unregulated market of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and compared the results with previous studies of the consistency on the European market [5].

Superficial second-degree skin burns (when burns extend through the epidermis and into the dermis, they are considered to be second-degree burns) can heal with or without resulting scar. Scar formation occurs when inflammation remains in the dermis after re-epithelialization, contributing to changes in skin architecture. Arash et al. [1]., presented a case report of A 47-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a second-degree thermal skin burn on her upper back, due to hot water exposure. The presented study, proposed application of topical clobetasol in combination with tretinoin in other to prevent the scar formation after superficial skin burn. It was observed that tretinoin enhanced the penetration and efficacy of clobetasol without exact pharmacodynamics of tretinoin. Combination of clobetasol and tretinoin was effective in control of erythema, thickening, and induration of the skin, which are early signs of hypertrophic scar formation, and prevented scar formation after a second-degree thermal burn. However, it is concluded that more studies are needed to support this finding and evaluate the efficacy and safety of this treatment.

Ants can induce hair shedding without effecting the structure of hair follicles. Pheidole pallidula (species of ants) can cut hairs and cause similar to Alopecia. There are several reports of ant-induced alopecia in medical literature, from Iran or Turkey and caused by P. pallidula. This species of ant is also found in many European countries of the Mediterranean region, North Africa, and the US, and therefore, this diagnosis should be considered in cases of localized alopecia or hair shedding in these geographic areas. Parisa et al. [2]., presented series of eight case reports on Ant-induced Alopecia observed in south-west of Iran and also presented their clinical findings and suggested accurate diagnosis. From the studies it was concluded that the P. pallidula is not known as a vector for any diseases, except for hair cutting and does not cause any harm to humans. Ant-induced alopeica does not require any treatment. However, avoiding re-exposure to this ant is helpful to prevent further hair loss. Hence, knowledge of this entity may help health providers in making accurate diagnoses in patients with localized alopecia and can prevent un-necessary diagnostic procedures or psychiatric consultations.

Parakeratosis is a mode of keratinization characterized by the retention of nuclei in the stratum corneum. Granular parakeratosis is a change of keratinization first described in armpits areas. The authors Rogerio Nabor Kondo et al. [3]., reported a case of a woman with inguinal lesions with granular parakeratosis. A 28-year old woman is having 4 months of hyperpigmented and hyperkeratotic plaques associated with discrete pruritus, in the inguinal folds. Histological examination displayed parakeratosis and retention of multiple basophilic granules in the stratum corneum. After clinic-histological correlation, diagnosis of granular parakeratosis was confirmed.

The published article by Karli Rosner et al. [4], talks on the application of human recombinant Dnase 1 (hrDnase 1), for eradication of multiple primary and metastatic melanoma types via in-vitro studies. In this study, authors attempted to amplify the killing efficiency of hrDNase1 and elucidate whether the cytotoxic properties of hrDNase1 extend to other primary and metastatic human melanoma cell types. Under improved transfection conditions, hrDNase1 killing efficiency was increased from 70-100% to 98-99%. Moreover, the selected gene construct achieved a killing efficiency of 97-100% with only half of the previously reported therapeutic dose. These results demonstrate that hrDNase1 is a potential therapeutic that can kill human melanoma cells in vitro regardless of their metastatic potential.

In both Europe and the USA, it is mandatory that personal care products are labelled with an ingredient list to assess exposure to known contact allergens. However, if the products are incorrectly labelled it cause an obstacle for patients trying to avoid allergens and also, obstruct the evaluation of clinical relevance for the clinician. Fatima et al. [5]., investigated the consistency between labelling and chemically detected amounts of 7 preservatives in consumer products bought on the unregulated market of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and compare the results with previous studies of the consistency on the European market. On this account, 64 personal care products and 2 washing-up liquids purchased in the UAE had their ingredient label examined and were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography. According to labelling, the most prevalent preservatives were parabens, phenoxyethanol and sodium benzoate. Parabens was observed to be 50% and Formaldehyde was detected in 24% products. However, in 9 of these labelled preservatives could not be detected. Hence, author concluded that the consistency between labelled and detected preservatives on the unregulated market of UAE is similar to that of the European market just as the current regulation came into act. Also, many products were incorrectly labelled which might affect consumer safety.

For more information: https://jacobspublishers.com/jacobs-journal-of-experimental-dermatology-issn-2379-514

Reference

  1. Taheri A. Topical Clobetasol in Combination with Tretinoin for Prevention of Scar Formation after Superficial Skin Burn. J J Exper Derm. 2014, 1(1): 001.
  2. Mansoori P. Ant-Induced Alopecia, A Case Series. J J Exper Derm. 2014, 1(1): 002.
  3. Kondo RN et al. Granular Parakeratosis-Case Report. J J Exper Derm. 2014, 1(1): 003.
  4. Rosner K. Eradication of Multiple Primary and Metastatic Melanoma Types in Vitro by Human Recombinant Dnase1. J J Exper Derm. 2014, 1(1): 004.
  5. Mamari F. Preservatives in a Selection of Consumer Products Purchased in the United Arab Emirates. J J Exper Derm. 2014, 1(1): 005.

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