Addiction Disorders and Therapy

Implications of Substance Use in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis: A Review

*Beth A Smith
Department Of Child And Adolescent Psychiatry, State University Of New York, United States

*Corresponding Author:
Beth A Smith
Department Of Child And Adolescent Psychiatry, State University Of New York, United States
Email:balucas@buffalo.edu

Published on: 2019-04-02

Abstract

Substance use and substance use disorders are very common, with high personal and societal costs. With increases in life expectancy, substance use has become more commonly identified in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Problem substance use has special implications for those with CF, including effects on the respiratory system, decreased adherence to medical treatments, and perhaps increased mortality. In the present review, we discuss commonly used substances including alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, opioids and benzodiazepines. We also discuss developmental considerations for substance use in adolescents and young adults with CF as well as special considerations for those undergoing transplantation.

Keywords

Substance use; Cystic fibrosis; Adolescence

Introduction

Substance use has reached epidemic proportions. It is estimated that, in 2016, 1 in 10 individuals aged 12 or older in the United States used illicit drugs in the past month, approximately 20.1 million people aged 12 or older had a substance use disorder (SUD) related to their use of alcohol or illicit drugs in the past year [1]. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common inherited, life-shortening chronic disease in the United States. Although CF remains a chronic, life-shortening illness, significant advances in treatment have extended median survival age, with many individuals with CF living well into their 40s and beyond [2]. Thus, more than half of the individuals with CF in the US are adults. It is therefore inevitable that cystic fibrosis (CF) Care Centers and providers will need to manage and treat the adverse effects associated with substance misuse.