Jacobs Journal of Anatomy and Physiology

First Report of a Persistent Mid-Gastric Intussusception in the Dog

* Steven Holladay
Department Of Veterinary Biosciences And Diagnostic Imaging, College Of Veterinary Medicine, University Of Georgia, Georgia, Greece

*Corresponding Author:
Steven Holladay
Department Of Veterinary Biosciences And Diagnostic Imaging, College Of Veterinary Medicine, University Of Georgia, Georgia, Greece
Email:sdholl@uga.edu

Published on: 2015-11-28

Abstract

Canine pylorogastric, gastroduodenal, and gastroesophageal intussusceptions have only rarely been reported in the veterinary literature, and were then associated with acute clinical signs that included vomiting, depression, dehydration, and abdominal pain. A mid-gastric intussusception was recently detected in a veterinary student dissection cadaver. Adhesions were wellformed within the intussusception suggesting persistence for some time before the dog was embalmed. The dog was not emaciated or otherwise noted as different before discovery of the intussusception. The present report describes a mid-gastric canine intussusception containing adhesions, something not yet reported in the veterinary literature.

Keywords

Intussusception, Mid-gastric, Gastrogastric, Persistent, Canine

Introduction

Intussusception is generally described as the prolapse of part of the intestine into the lumen of the immediately-adjoining part. Intestinal intussusception in dogs has been associated with excessive or severe vomiting, gut hypermotility, parasitism, masses, and surgical procedures. The diagnosis of canine intussusception is often by ultrasonography, and treatment may vary from manual reduction to intestinal resection and anastomosis. Rarely spontaneous resolution may occur. In both dogs and cats, intussusceptions occur most commonly along the jejunum or proximal ileum, or at the ileocecocolic junction, and are then most often in the direction of normal peristalsis. Prolapse against the direction of normal peristalsis has been reported including duodenogastric, pylorogastric and gastroesophageal intussusceptions. Intussusception involving the stomach is rare, and only two examples of canine gastrogastric and fewer than ten examples of canine grastroesophageal intussusceptions have been reported. This is the first report of a persistent canine mid-stomach gastrogastric intussusception.