Jacobs Journal of Anatomy and Physiology

The hCG Family of Independent Molecules

*Laurence A. Cole
Department Of Obstetrics And Gynecology, University Of New Mexico, USA, United States

*Corresponding Author:
Laurence A. Cole
Department Of Obstetrics And Gynecology, University Of New Mexico, USA, United States
Email:larry@hcglab.com

Published on: 2018-04-23

Abstract

Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a very unique rule breaker to the basic guidelines of biochemistry and physiology, it is one name and a large group of 5 or 6 completely independent or separate molecules. Each has a common a-subunit and ß-subunit amino acid sequence and is separated by difference in O-glycosylation, differences in N-glycosylation, differences in sulfation and differences in mutations and merism (Table 1). It is with these differences that the forms of hCG somehow fold differently, bind different receptors and have partially-independent or completely independent roles. Recently, a simplified renaming was recommended, hCG-1, hCG-2, hCG-3, hCG-4, hCG-4ß and hCG-5. These names are used in parenthesis after the lengthy names commonly used and used in this report (Submitted 2016, “The hCG Family of Independent Molecules Needs Urgent Renaming.” Obstet Gynecol).

Keywords

Introduction

Briefly, there is the original hormone hCG (hCG-1) produced by placenta syncytiotrophoblast cells during pregnancy, molecular weight 36,525 (Table 1). The hormone acts on an luteinizing hormone (LH)/hCG joint hormone receptor and controls establishment of hemochorial placentation a fetal nutrition system during pregnancy. The hormone also control suppression of contractions during pregnancy, suppression of maternal macrophage phagocytosis during pregnancy, and promotion of maternal corpus luteum progesterone production during early pregnancy.