Jacobs Journal of Anesthesiology and Research

C-Mac Videolaryngoscope: A Patient Safety Device and Teaching Tool?

*George W. Williams
Department Of Anesthesiology, University Of Texas Medical School, Texas, United States

*Corresponding Author:
George W. Williams
Department Of Anesthesiology, University Of Texas Medical School, Texas, United States
Email:george.w.williams@uth.tmc.edu

Published on: 2015-03-23

Abstract

The fundamental responsibility of the anesthesiologists in the teaching hospitals is to teach direct laryngoscopy and intubation a new resident or a novice student. The instructor and the trainee cannot share patient’s direct laryngoscopic view while intubating with traditional Macintosh laryngoscopes without great effort and questionable reliability. This is significant source of anxiety for the attending anesthesiologist while teaching direct laryngoscopy and intubation to a trainee. The traditional relationship between attending anesthesiologist and a novice student while performing laryngoscopy and intubation involves blinded verbal feedback to the trainee and/or the instructor “looking over the shoulder” to share the view of the airway.

Keywords

Introduction

The fundamental responsibility of the anesthesiologists in the teaching hospitals is to teach direct laryngoscopy and intubation a new resident or a novice student. The instructor and the trainee cannot share patient’s direct laryngoscopic view while intubating with traditional Macintosh laryngoscopes without great effort and questionable reliability. This is significant source of anxiety for the attending anesthesiologist while teaching direct laryngoscopy and intubation to a trainee. The traditional relationship between attending anesthesiologist and a novice student while performing laryngoscopy and intubation involves blinded verbal feedback to the trainee and/or the instructor “looking over the shoulder” to share the view of the airway. The leading and most dreadful cause of morbidity and mortality in Anesthesiology is difficulty during airway management and inability to intubate. In an attempt to improve the quality of trainee education and patient safety, airway educators have developed methods to share and expand the view of the airway. Videolaryngoscopes appear to have considerable promise in airway management and also as a teaching tool. Education using a video system mounted into a traditional Macintosh blade improves intubation skills in medical students when videolaryngoscopes are used for training. The downside of these systems as described is that the video laryngoscope is still being used as a video laryngoscope, and this approach does not replicate the action of traditional direct laryngoscopy without video assistance. We describe a case involving the intubation of a patient by a trainee with no intubating experience using C-Mac for direct laryngoscopy with video supervision by the attending anesthesiologist.