Jacobs Journal of Anesthesiology and Research

Toward A Quantum Pain Concept

*Cengiz Mordeniz
Department Of Anesthesiology And Intensive Care And Algology, Medical Faculty Of Namik Kemal University, Tunca, Turkey

*Corresponding Author:
Cengiz Mordeniz
Department Of Anesthesiology And Intensive Care And Algology, Medical Faculty Of Namik Kemal University, Tunca, Turkey
Email:cengizmorster@gmail.com

Published on: 2018-10-23

Abstract

Keywords

Introduction

Descartes’ reflex theory, explaining the transmission of pain, through a single channel from the skin to the brain has directed both the study and treatment of pain for more than 300 years. It is still considered in physiology textbooks as fact rather than theory. The gate control theory proposed by Melzack and Wall, led to further investigation of spinal sensitization and central nervous system plasticity. Since researchers have failed so far to identify specific cortical regions particular for the perception of pain, Ronald Melzack has developed the concept of Neuromatrix, as a widespread ensemble of neurons integrating different sources of nociceptive and non-nociceptive input. The function of the Neuromatrix has not been restricted just to the perception of pain, but also to many other possible perceptual subjects. The experience of pain is not just the result of the activity of a particular cortical area containing specific nociceptive neurons exclusively ‘‘encoding’’ pain. The neuromatrix, a network of neurons,turns the flowing information into a pattern as a sense of whole body. Both conventional macroscopic and microscopic neuroimaging approaches have repeatJacobs Journal of Anesthesiology and Research JACOBS PUBLISHERS edly failed to isolate a‘‘neural representation’’ of pain in the brain. Neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have shown that nociceptive stimuli provoke an extensive cortical network, so-called “pain matrix” including somatosensory, insular and cingulate, frontal and parietal areas.