Jacobs Journal of Cancer Science and Research

Immunotherapeutic Approach to Anal Cancer

*Timothy Allen
Department Of Oncology, Enter For Excellence In Research And Development, United States

*Corresponding Author:
Timothy Allen
Department Of Oncology, Enter For Excellence In Research And Development, United States
Email:Timothy.Allen@gapsos.com

Published on: 2017-10-25

Abstract

Anal cancer is a rare disease that accounts for 0.4% of all cancer diagnoses in the United States. Its incidence has increased by 2.2% annually. The risk factors associated with anal cancer are Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), sexual practices, smoking and immunosupression. Immunotherapy is an alternative to chemotherapy and radiation that uses a patient’s own immune system to fight the cancer. This can be done by giving the patients man-made immune system proteins to stimulate their immune system. In this paper, we will discuss the current trends in utilizing immunotherapy to fight anal cancer along with the different molecules involved in the proliferation of the disease.

Keywords

Anal Cancer; Immunotherapy; Immunosupression; Kinase; Cytokine; Multiclonal Antibodies; Interferons

Introduction

Anal cancer is a rare disease that accounts for only 1-2% of all the world’s cancers. In 2014, SEER estimated 7, 210 new cases and 950 deaths were due to anal cancer in the United States. The five-year survival rate of patients diagnosed with anal cancer is 65.5%. That statistic also represents 0.4% of overall cancers in the United States. According to SEER, the age-standardized rate of incidence is 1.8 per 1,00,000 persons. It includes different types of the histopathological and genetic characteristic. The male-to-female ratio for susceptibility to this cancer is 3:4. Higher incidences were observed between the age of 55 to 64.