Jacobs Journal of Cancer Science and Research

Immunotherapy and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

*Timothy Allen
Department Of Oncology, Enter For Excellence In Research And Development, United States

*Corresponding Author:
Timothy Allen
Department Of Oncology, Enter For Excellence In Research And Development, United States
Email:Timothy.Allen@gapsos.com

Published on: 2018-10-23

Abstract

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a serious type of cancer that originates from the development and differentiation o the early version of lymphocytes in the bone marrow. With the advent of new technologies and discoveries, novel therapeutics were developed to treat these malignancies. Targeted immunotherapies are drugs that block the growth and spread of the cancer by interfering with specific molecules or pathways that are involved in carcinogenesis. It is a developing treatment alternative to chemotherapy and radiation. In this paper, we will discuss the current trends in various target therapies along with the different molecules involved in the proliferation of the disease.

Keywords

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Immunotherapy; Immunosuppression; Kinase Inhibitors; Cytokines; Monoclonal Antibodies; Interferons

Introduction

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is a serious type of malignancies, which represents 0.1% of all the adult cancers and 25% of all the cancers diagnosed among children younger than 15 years. According to the American Cancer Society, the age-standardized rate of incidence is eight cases per 100,000 in the age group of 1–4 years and one to two cases per 100,000, above the age of 55 years. The overall five-year survival rate is 68.8%. For children younger than 15 years, the survival rate is 91.7 and 92.6% for children younger than 5 years. There is an annual increase of 1.4%, in the incidence worldwide.