Jacobs Journal of Hematology

Current Status of Research on Circulating Tumor Cells in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

* Feng Wang
Department Of Medical Oncology, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Guo Xue Xiang Street. Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, China

*Corresponding Author:
Feng Wang
Department Of Medical Oncology, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Guo Xue Xiang Street. Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, China
Email:wangfeng5024@126.com

Published on: 2019-12-30

Abstract

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (hnscc) is the sixth most common malignancy in the world, accounting for about 6% of all malignancies, with a five-year overall survival rate of about 45%-70%.About 10%-50% of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma will develop lymph nodes, and lymph node metastasis strongly predicts poor prognosis. How to carry out early detection of disease progression and invasive judgment is one of the research hotspots of head and neck cancer. Circulating tumor cells are the general term for tumor cells in peripheral blood. They are usually produced by primary or metastatic lesions spontaneously or should be detached into the blood circulation. It is considered to be an important biological process leading to distant metastasis of tumors.

Keywords

circulating tumor cells; head and neck squamous cell carcinoma; liquid biopsy; clinical application

Introduction

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (hnscc) is the sixth most common malignancy in the world, accounting for about 6% of all malignancies, with a five-year overall survival rate of about 45%-70%.About 10%-50% of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma will develop lymph nodes, and lymph node metastasis strongly predicts poor prognosis. How to carry out early detection of disease progression and invasive judgment is one of the research hotspots of head and neck cancer. Circulating tumor cells are the general term for tumor cells in peripheral blood. They are usually produced by primary or metastatic lesions spontaneously or should be detached into the blood circulation. It is considered to be an important biological process leading to distant metastasis of tumors. As a potential biomarker, circulating tumor cells can provide information about early tumor metastasis, treatment response, and recurrence monitoring. The non-invasive, convenient and real-time nature of the detection of peripheral blood can provide a clinically non-invasive access to tumor samples. Inclusion in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma may help identify patients with highly aggressive tumors early in the disease. This article will review the detection technology of circulating tumor cells and its application status and research results in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.