Jacobs Journal of Internal Medicine

Incidence of Hypertension in Coronary Artery Disease Patients in Eastern Province Saudi Arabia

*Emad Ali Saleh AL-Khoufi
Department Of Medicine, College Of Medicine, King Faisal University, Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia

*Corresponding Author:
Emad Ali Saleh AL-Khoufi
Department Of Medicine, College Of Medicine, King Faisal University, Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia
Email:emadco2@hotmail.com

Published on: 2015-06-02

Abstract

Background: Epidemiological studies have suggested a strong association between hypertension and coronary artery disease (CAD). Hypertension is one of the major independent risk factor in CAD. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of hypertension among CAD patients attending cardiac outpatient clinic at Prince Sultan Cardiac Center Hospital, Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia.

Keywords: Hypertension; Coronary Artery Disease; Incidence; Saudi Arabia.

Methods: The present study was conducted on 151 patients ( 64 men and 87 women) attending cardiac clinic at Prince Sultan Cardiac Center Hospital, Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia. Hypertension was prospectively defined as a systolic ≥140 mmHg or diastolic ≥90 mmHg or patient on current anti-hypertensive drugs and CAD has been diagnosed by electrocardiogram, blood tests (cardiac markers), cardiac stress testing or a coronary angiogram.

Results: Hypertension was recorded in 76% of the CAD patients included in study. In addition 24% of the patients had at least one attack of myocardial infraction and 4% had stroke.

Conclusion: The Incidence of Hypertension among adults Saudis with CAD is three times higher than reported for the general population (26%). We recommend early screening and aggressive management of blood pressure in the general population.

Keywords

Introduction

The prevalence of coronary artery disease in Saudi Arabia is around 6% while the prevalence of hypertension is 26 % in general population [1]. Epidemiological studies suggest a strong and consistent link between hypertension and coronary artery disease. This does not mean that hypertension is the cause of coronary artery disease. Less than a quarter of the risk of developing coronary artery disease can be attributed to raised blood pressure. The results of most of the trials, largely in men with mild to moderate uncomplicated hypertension, demonstrate that a modest short-term reduction in blood pressure confers a reduction in coronary artery disease events of about 16% [2].