Jacobs Journal of Organic Chemistry

Value Added Products from Pyrolysis of Sludges from Pork Production

*Lawrence M. Pratt
Department Of Chemistry, University Of Science, National University, Ho Chi Minh City, China

*Corresponding Author:
Lawrence M. Pratt
Department Of Chemistry, University Of Science, National University, Ho Chi Minh City, China
Email:lpratt@mec.cuny.edu

Published on: 2017-09-05

Abstract

Treatment of waste products from pork production results in two types of sludge. The first is high-fat sludge from physical treatment and dewatering. That sludge is further treated by a proprietary biological process, resulting in a second type of sludge that generates less odor. Pyrolysis of both sludges yields an oily distillate, an aqueous distillate, and biochar. The oily distillate from the physical treatment consists primarily of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons that are components of diesel fuel, and thus, has commercial potential as a fuel precursor. The oil from the biological treatment is a complex mixture with less commercial potential. The biochar from both types of sludge was evaluated for its potential as a fuel and as a soil amendment.

Keywords

Pork sludge; Biofuel; Hydrocarbons; Biochar; Aromatics

Introduction

Pork production results in waste sludge from the inedible portions of the swine. These include blood, skin, and residue of pigs, fat, and hair, as well as residual water. Slaughterhouse wastewater typically contains fats, proteins, cellulose, and water soluble organic compounds [1]. The sludge initially undergoes a physical treatment involving the unit operations of adsorbtion, coagulation, floatation, and disinfection. The resulting sludge with variable water content is sent to a holding area. A typical pork plant in Vietnam produces about 20 cubic meters of this sludge per day. It is then further treated by a proprietary biological process, in which the volume and odor are greatly reduced. The high fats, oils, and greases (FOG) content of pork waste makes it of interest for production of biofuels. Several other methods for slaughterhouse waste treatment have been developed, including oxidation and anaerobic digestion [2-6]. We have had success in obtaining kerosene-like hydrocarbon mixtures from other sources of waste oil, particularly brown grease.