Journal of Clinical Pediatrics and Neonatal Care

A Systematic Review of Cardiac Autonomic Modulation in Mothers and Their Infants

*Profa. Dra. Ana Cristina Silva Rebelo
Department Of Pediatrics, Federal University Of Goiás, Goiania, GO,, Brazil

*Corresponding Author:
Profa. Dra. Ana Cristina Silva Rebelo
Department Of Pediatrics, Federal University Of Goiás, Goiania, GO,, Brazil
Email:anacristina.silvarebelo@gmail.com

Published on: 2016-08-19

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the publications that have examined cardiac autonomic modulation and to verify how the relationship between mothers and preterm infants can influence cardiac autonomic parameters. Method: The articles identified by the search strategy were assessed independently and blinded by two researchers, strictly adhering to the next inclusion criteria: (1) published between 01/01/2004 and 06/02/2014; (2) written in English; (3) had an available abstract; and (4) pertained to the mothers and/or their premature babies. Results: Of 83 publications originally found, 5 eligible studies were ultimately identified. Of these five articles pertaining to Heart Rate Variability, two articles studied preterm infants, two articles studied a sample of mothers and one article evaluated the association between Heart Rate Variability and mothers of preterm infants. Conclusion: Mothers and their relationships with their preterm infants are essential for increased cardiac autonomic modulation.

Keywords

Heart Rate Variability; Mothers; Preterms; Autonomic Modulation

Introduction

This study was motivated by a clinical concern about infant growth, seeking to contribute to the comfort and wellbeing of preterm neonates. Neurobehavioral development can be improved through kangaroo care (KC), particularly when this care begins early. It is known that heart activity is largely modulated by the autonomic nervous system (ANS), which promotes rapid adjustments to the cardiovascular system in reaction to different stimuli such as stress, physical exercise and postural changes in normal and pathological conditions [1,2].