Journal of Molecular Biomarkers and Clinical Trials

Association between the 8-OHdG Level in Placental/Umbilical Cord Blood and Maternal/Neonatal Characteristics at Full-Term Birth

*Ikuo Kashiwakura
Department Of Molecular Biomarkers, Japan, Japan

*Corresponding Author:
Ikuo Kashiwakura
Department Of Molecular Biomarkers, Japan, Japan
Email:ikashi@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp

Published on: 2018-06-02

Abstract

The aim of this study was to estimate the relationship between the levels of a DNA damage biomarker, 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), in placental/umbilical cord blood (CB) and maternal/neonatal characteristics at full-term birth.

Methods We used ELISA kits to measure the 8-OHdG levels in CB in mothers with full-term normal vaginal deliveries. The possible relationships between the 8-OHdG levels and infant birth weight, placental weight and placental weight per infant birth weight were assessed.

Results The 8-OHdG levels in the CB ranged from 0.11 to 1.19 ng/ml, with a median of 0.41 ng/ml (mean: 0.43 ± 0.21 n/ml). Significant positive correlations were observed between the 8-OHdG levels and placental weight or placental weight per infant birth weight (r=0.343, p=0.007, r=0.368, p=0.004, respectively). However, no significant correlations were observed between the 8-OHdG levels and infant birth weight. In addition, when the maternal body mass index (BMI) values were classified into three groups, significant positive correlations were observed between the 8-OHdG levels and placental weight per infant birth weight in the BMI 18.5–25 group and between the 8-OHdG levels and placental weight in the BMI ≥ 25 group.

Conclusions These findings demonstrate the possibility that the 8-OHdG level in CB is correlated with placental growth and suggest that the maternal physique affects this correlation

Keywords

Oxidative Stress; 8-OHdG; Placental/Umbilical Cord Blood; Body Mass Index; Placenta

Introduction

Oxidative stress is defined as a disturbance in the prooxidant/antioxidant balance in favor of the former, leading to potential damage [1]. Oxygen is one of the most important elements required to sustain life. However, the oxidizing potential of oxygen can result in toxic biological effects. Some of the oxygen taken up by the body during respiration is used to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) during energy metabolism or defense against pathogens. ROS may induce oxidative damage to DNA and are associated with various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and atherosclerosis [2-6].