Volume 2 Issue 1

December 2016

Volume 2  Issue 1

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Perspective

The Double Face of Janus: A Historical Account of the Emergence of Bone Marrow Transplantation

Camilla Scanlan*, Ian Kerridge

History of modern blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) emerged, as is the case with most new biomedical interventions from sustained clinical and scientific research. But BMT also has a much darker antecedent – nuclear power and chemical warfare. It is important that we know the full story of the emergence of BMT for two reasons. The first is that it illustrates how accounts of the history of medicine in  terms of heroes and beneficent progress are simplistic and often erroneous. The second is that it reminds us that biomedical knowledge may arise from human misery and may also cause it.

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Review Article

Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) – Clinical Implications

Arnon Blum*, Nava Blum

The endothelium is responsible for the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system and other organs by producing and secreting molecular signals, activating and upgrading expression of receptors on many cell surfaces including endothelial cells themselves, a self-perpetuating condition that is accelerating with time until a specific mechanism blocks the signals. Most of the endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) reside in niches within the bone marrow and are released only “on demand” when a certain trigger is activated – like ischemia or an increase in oxidative radicals or other inflammatory trigger is activated – recruiting them to remote areas of ischemia where they are most needed for regeneration of blood vessels.

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Research Article

Increased Risk for Relapse if ATG is Included in Reduced-Intensity Conditioning HSCT with Sibling Donors

Mats Remberger*, Jonas Mattsson

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an established curative treatment for patients with hematological malignancies, bone-marrow failure syndrome, primary immunodeficiencies, and inborn metabolic disorders. In the early days of HSCT, most patients were treated with high dose myeloablative chemo/radio-therapy (MAC) with the aim to kill most malignant cells and create space for the new marrow.

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Research Article 

Emerging Concepts for Articular Cartilage Regeneration

Luminita Labusca *, Udo Greisser4, Kaveh Mashayekhi

The field of articular cartilage repair attracts considerable interest from the part of basic scientists, bioengineers and medics. Numerous teams are engaged in the quest for finding the most viable and enduring method for restoring a damaged joint surface. However, after several decades of intense research, cartilage diseases still represent an unmet clinical need.

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Case Report

Pomalidomide as Consolidation Therapy after Salvage Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

Mary Steinbach*, Tim Luetkens, Kristen Vinik, Sabarinath Venniyil Radhakrishanan, Djordje Atanackovic

Over the past decade there have been many advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). However, in the first-line setting, induction treatment followed by high-dose chemotherapy plus autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is still considered the standard of care for eligible patients. Regardless of previous treatment and progression history, maintenance therapy has become a mainstay in myeloma treatment.

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